Wednesday, May 31, 2006

Green and Wet

When I left Thanet just after 9am this morning, it was in the middle of a howling wind and driving rain. If it had snowed, like it did in ‘75’, I wouldn’t have been surprised.

The rain and solid muddy skies didn’t stop until we popped-up above the clouds at over five thousand feet with a thin layer of ice on the leading edges of my wings. “It’s the day before June” I thought, “and outside it’s five degree below zero.”

It wasn’t much better until just before Southampton, when the cloud started to break but I’m pleased to see that for the coming weekend, temperatures of 18 Celsius are promised. It’s not a heat wave but it can’t get much worse.

And as for the drought, I can assure you that England, as far as Weston Super Mare, is looking very green, very lush and very wet indeed!

4 comments:

Anonymous said...

Ah.me old son, me beauty, its all to do with 'percolation'according to them experts on the TV!
It's as if ground sources and aquifers were the only way water companies can catch, move or store rain. According to them we need biblical portions of H2O that would get Noah building before we can say drought is over!

Anonymous said...

anon again!
I think that if the opportunity were given, I would have turned left at Southampton (if flying West) and kept going for another couple of thousand Km Southward.

Anonymous said...

You could have then reported back on a proper drought.

Anonymous said...

Anonymous said...
You could have then reported back on a proper drought.

12:39 PM

anon again!

sorry to disappoint! The Spanish do it properly. Drought is hardly ever known. Even the Maroccans do it correctly. They mix sea water with fresh (sweet) to use for washing machines, and shower/bath water. They don't waste any, instead, they have 2 water supplies into most coastal property's 1 fresh, 1 sea water. They have a mixer for adjusting the water substances...ie., slightly more sea water in the washing machine, slightly less in the shower.
A brilliant safe way to save SWEET water.